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The romantic lyricism of the great Persian poet Hafiz (1315-1390) continues to be admired around the world. Recent exploration of that lyricism by Iranian scholars has revealed that, in addition to his masterful use of poetic devices, Hafiz's verse is deeply steeped in the philosophy and symbolism of Persian love mysticism. This innovative volume discusses the aesthetic thThe romantic lyricism of the great Persian poet Hafiz (1315-1390) continues to be admired around the world. Recent exploration of that lyricism by Iranian scholars has revealed that, in addition to his masterful use of poetic devices, Hafiz's verse is deeply steeped in the philosophy and symbolism of Persian love mysticism. This innovative volume discusses the aesthetic theories and mystical philosophy of the classical Persian love-lyric (ghazal) as particularly exemplified by Hafiz (who, along with Rumi and Sa'di, is Persia's most celebrated poet). For the first time in western literature, Hafiz's rhetoric of romance is situated within the broader context of what scholars refer to as "Love Theory" in Arabic and Persian poetry in particular and Islamic literature more generally. Contributors from both the West and Iran conduct a major investigation of the love lyrics of Hafiz and of what they signified to that high culture and civilization which was devoted to the School of Love in medieval Persia. The volume will have strong appeal to scholars of the Middle East, medieval Islamic literature, and the history and culture of Iran....

Title : Hafiz and the Religion of Love in Classical Persian Poetry
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ISBN : 9781848853393
Format Type : Hardcover
Number of Pages : 432 Pages
Status : Available For Download
Last checked : 21 Minutes ago!

Hafiz and the Religion of Love in Classical Persian Poetry Reviews

  • Bryn Hammond
    2018-12-21 02:07

    A fine book on a lovely subject, in Spenser’s lost usage of that word: ‘has to do with love’. Lovely, in the use Spenser may have made up, becomes a strong word where otherwise it is a weak.As one who has happily perused the ‘courtly love’ literature of medieval Europe – Christendom – this contemporary tradition in Islamdom is gorgeous in its similarities and its paths pursued that are arguably more strange. Since I grew up on Lancelot, the self-devotion to an ideal of love in these pages is amazingly moving. When has love ever been so in fashion? Not today; its heyday was the 12th, 13th centuries, and I am intrigued by its simultaneous flowering in these neighbour climes. Influence, yes; but what was in the air?I understand that these poets have had ‘easy translations’ into English that make them merely dissolute. As fun as that is, it misses the secret language… not abstruse, mark you, nothing need be abstruse; it misses what the talk of wine and goblets stood for, the religious underpinnings to the idea of the beloved, and other pertinent matter explained in this book. It is a Sufi explication of Islam, irreverent to conventional pieties, to the point of cheerful blasphemy… you know the drill. But deeply religious at its heart: true religion, which (everywhere in the world, they believed) was the Religion of Love and none other. I haven’t finished. Research needs push ever on and on, down from the door where they began. I’ll come back, and I look forward to it. One note: The editor has ascertained that Hafiz’s poems were addressed to a woman – to his own satisfaction, which he feels ought to be to ours. It seems there is no real reason to decide either way (you can find this out in the footnotes), and I think the question should be left open-ended. So that others too, Mr Editor, can read the way they are most comfortable with.

  • Joseph Mccaleb
    2019-01-06 01:10

    As someone who doesn’t read Arabic or Persian but loves Rumi and has been drawn into Hafiz, this volume of essays provided an excellent resource for entering Hafiz’ tavern. The work of exposing hypocrisy while holding to the Religion of Love demands dedication and inspiration. The array of authors provides a good range of openings into the culture behind Hafiz’ work and into the particular literary form of the ghazal. While knowledge is not sufficient to taste the beauty, my appreciation and experience of Hafiz has been increased through reading this book. I particularly liked the essays by Lewisohn and Morris. Helpful comparisons are made with predecessors and contemporaries as well as poets who have subsequently been influenced by Hafiz. Although the authors provide sufficient illustrations from Hafiz, I frequently wanted to see an entire ghazal and/or to compare the translation and valued reading from Peter Avery’s "Collected Lyrics of Hafiz of Shiraz" as well as the translations by Green and Lewisohn/Bly.

  • Doutor Branco
    2019-01-12 03:10

    It is a very good book about Hafiz's life and work.