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High school will be a breeze for Jenni Kershaw - if she lives long enough to enroll, that is. Jenni's ordinary, eighth grade life becomes a thing of the past when her science class goes on a field trip. Armed with only their notebooks, MP3 players, and wits, Jenni and her classmates are unknowingly transported to another world. There they encounter amazing creatures, someHigh school will be a breeze for Jenni Kershaw - if she lives long enough to enroll, that is. Jenni's ordinary, eighth grade life becomes a thing of the past when her science class goes on a field trip. Armed with only their notebooks, MP3 players, and wits, Jenni and her classmates are unknowingly transported to another world. There they encounter amazing creatures, some of which think a kid shish kebab would be a tasty treat. But they soon find the greatest dangers they face may come from themselves ... Follow Jenni and her class on their extraordinary adventures in their fight to discover who - and what - they really are....

Title : A Measure of Disorder
Author :
Rating :
ISBN : 9780982686416
Format Type : Paperback
Number of Pages : 352 Pages
Status : Available For Download
Last checked : 21 Minutes ago!

A Measure of Disorder Reviews

  • Alan
    2018-10-30 09:01

    I wrote this book as something I'd like to read, and hoped my kids would enjoy it as well : ) So far the number one question I get asked is: "When is the next one coming out? I need to read it now!"I hope you enjoy reading it as much as I enjoyed writing it!

  • Ashley Chen
    2018-11-20 04:20

    FIVE SHINNY, HAPPY STARS!It starts out reminding me of Percy Jackson with the field trip. At first I though this is going to be a copy cat but as they story moves along, was I ever wrong. First of all, the story moves at the PERFECT pace, not boringly slow but not too fast so that it can include details. The characters are full of characters, whoa that sounded weird. I did not hate any of the characters (and I always hate some characters in a book). I really like juvenile book characters where the book do not focus on relationships with the main girl and guy, but focus on the mystical story. Rather the book focus on the journey, or adventure the main characters have. The plot is so captivating that I couldn't put it down.I love the setting! It is very mysterious and magical. This is definitely one reason I love juvenile books. The descriptions allow you imagine yourself the world full with elemental spirits, goblins, dragons and more.The story kind of reminds me of Narnia with all the creatures and enchanting sceneries. But a better comparison might be the mini 2 part series of Neverland.I really enjoyed the evil side's POV; to me, it was far more interesting than the good side. It just feel like there was more going on then the good side. The good side just basically walked, not very interesting. But with the evil side, you discover a lot of things which is awesome.Seriously this book was amazing! It had all I wanted in a book. Even with Michael Scott's books I had to put it down and reread it months after. And this is why I am drawn towards books that are for ages 9-12 because I don't want to deal with the crappy relationships and other boring stuff YA books offer me.

  • Jessica
    2018-10-30 09:20

    When Alan asked me to review this book, I was excited! I've always been a huge fantasy fan, and anything in that realm usually tends to be right up my alley. After reading the synopsis and realizing that this was about a school class, I was even more excited. I work with children, and finding books to hold their interest for long periods of time is always difficult. Thus, I dove in.A Measure of Disorder revolves around a class trip gone awry. The students find themselves mysteriously transported to another land, where amazing things can and do happen. I extremely enjoyed the land of Mother! Following the characters through their adventure felt so much more vivid because of the landscape that Alan had built.I will admit that this story does start out a bit slow. Please don't be put off by that. The build up doesn't really begin until the students leave their Earthen home, but it is well worth the wait. As I neared the end of the book, I found myself reading ravenously to find out what happened.Overall I enjoyed this book and would recommend it to younger age lovers of fantasy. Make sure to read the teaser at the end of the book for book two! I am excited to see where Alan takes the story in the sequel.

  • Peep (Pop! Pop!)
    2018-11-09 07:05

    Trying out a shorter review:It's very hard to talk about this book without talking about spoilers. And since there aren't that many reviews, I'd rather not post a spoiler review. It totally immerses you in Mother. It's not the same as our Earth, it's a different Earth that has more than just humans and animals. The author did a great job at creating a new world. You get pulled in and it really makes you appreciate the beauty of nature. It's full of descriptions of this world, so you really have to get out of your element to really appreciate all that's going on. Again, no spoilers, so I can't elaborate!People that love nature, the environment, love epic adventures, or like reading about other worlds would really appreciate this series. Some parts got really deep and made you think. I got the feeling that there was more going on and that the book was trying to make a point. But between you and me, I'm kinda dense so it flew over my head. :P It's not normally a genre I would read, but I'm still glad I read it. I believe that people that love this genre would give it a much higher rating. I freely admit that I can be stingy with the stars. Anywho, make sure you check out the sneak peek at the second book in this series!

  • Jennifer Wardrip
    2018-11-12 06:04

    Reviewed by Candace Cunard for TeensReadToo.comEighth-grader Jenni Kershaw might not be part of the popular crowd, but she does well in school, has a few close friends, and lives a fairly normal life--that is, until everyone on her school science fieldtrip mysteriously falls asleep and wakes up in a different world.The students decide to scout the land and look for some answers--or at least some edible food--and that's when Jenni encounters a "local," a dwarflike man who calls himself Crank and helps Jenni and the rest of her classmates understand the world to which they've been transported. In this world, called simply "Mother," Crank explains that there are different types of people born into specific roles. His people, for example, work with machines, another tends to animals, and others still are born fighters, explorers, or even spirits tied to particular elements.Crank offers to lead the students back to his village, where they are directed to continue on a journey to the capital city in hopes that someone there can help them understand their situation. They set out, but Mother is not always a kind world, and they are beset by marauding bands who injure some of their number and impede their progress. And that's not all--the students soon discover that living in this world is working strange changes on all of them, transforming them into different species found on Mother, and sometimes not for the best.Alan Tucker provides an engaging mix between the typical hero-focused quest story and a broader exploration of self-development. Although Jenni is the main character, and most of the story is told from her perspective, Tucker narrates portions of the novel from the perspectives of others, which helps to expose these characters' conflicted motivations. Once the initial group of students splits up, with some deciding to join with the powerful shapeshifter Mogritas who promises to help them develop their powers but possesses an ulterior motive for this generosity, the technique of jumping back and forth between perspectives increases suspense.Although the book got off to something of a slow start, with the characters trying to figure out why they'd been transported and what they were going to do about it, once the transformation of the students into Mother creatures began the plot really took off. The transformations allow Tucker to showcase the personalities of these very different characters, and although it could be confusing to keep track of the entire cast of students at all times, by the end I had a fair sense of who everyone was.The conclusion, while satisfying, leaves plenty of room for the next works in this series, and I'll be interested to see where Tucker takes this story next.

  • Readingtween
    2018-11-17 10:18

    First going into this book, I didn't have very high hopes. Occasionally I will judge a book by it's cover. This book's cover art is not the best I had ever seen. Then I started to read the book. The beginning was nothing very special, but slowly it started to progress until... I was hooked! I could hardly put this book down. Reading Teen followers, you will have your doubts before reading this book. DON'T. It is WELL written, well thought out, and the whole concept is completely insane. Which makes for one great fantasy book. In my opinion... the more insane the book, the better fantasy it makes! This amazing book by Alan Tucker makes you want for these insane things to happen, things that would never really be possible. Hence the word fantasy. You will so know what I'm talking about when you read it.I never have even heard of this book if the author Alan Tucker hadn't sent me a copy. He was so freakin' cool to have taken the time to send me one. Thanks dude! At the current moment it needs more publicity. This book has earned it. I am positive that there are hundreds, thousands of books that need to be read because their great. But I can only read so many books. And, yes, most of the books that I read, I only read because I hear of that book from a friend or family member and now an author ( I'm moving up ). I wish that good books like this were more recognized. This review is the best thing that I can do to achieve some publicity for this book.This is a great book and I can't wait until the sequel comes out. I will be highly anticipating it and can only hope that it is as good as the first.Austin (13 years old)http://ReadingTween.blogspot.com/

  • Reading Teen
    2018-10-22 07:01

    First going into this book, I didn't have very high hopes. Occasionally I will judge a book by it's cover. This book's cover art is not the best I had ever seen. Then I started to read the book. The beginning was nothing very special, but slowly it started to progress until... I was hooked! I could hardly put this book down. Reading Teen followers, you will have your doubts before reading this book. DON'T. It is WELL written, well thought out, and the whole concept is completely insane. Which makes for one great fantasy book. In my opinion... the more insane the book, the better fantasy it makes! This amazing book by Alan Tucker makes you want for these insane things to happen, things that would never really be possible. Hence the word fantasy. You will so know what I'm talking about when you read it.I never have even heard of this book if the author Alan Tucker hadn't sent me a copy. He was so freakin' cool to have taken the time to send me one. Thanks dude! At the current moment it needs more publicity. This book has earned it. I am positive that there are hundreds, thousands of books that need to be read because their great. But I can only read so many books. And, yes, most of the books that I read, I only read because I hear of that book from a friend or family member and now an author ( I'm moving up ). I wish that good books like this were more recognized. This review is the best thing that I can do to achieve some publicity for this book.This is a great book and I can't wait until the sequel comes out. I will be highly anticipating it and can only hope that it is as good as the first.- Austin ReadingTeen

  • Michelle Isenhoff
    2018-10-29 05:10

    Who knew a simple science field trip could turn into such a whale of an adventure? Jenni Kershaw and her classmates can’t seem to find the bus for the return trip to school. Then they notice the landscape has changed, the vegetation is unfamiliar, not to mention the peculiar talking wildlife. They’ve been brought to an entirely new world.Alan Tucker has a wild imagination, down to the tiniest, seemingly insignificant detail. But all those details become important as Jenni and her friends change form and learn to survive on Mother. This one is more than just an adventure, though. It touches on some deeper themes: balance, the shape of one’s soul (reflected in outward appearance), good vs. evil, and the problem of living within societal expectations that just don’t fit. (Prediction: I think if society doesn’t change in the next two books, there’s going to be some serious breaking out of those expectations!)Here’s one of my favorite quotes: “Things that happen out of our control happen for a reason. Even if we can’t always understand what that reason might be.” Sounds almost biblical, doesn’t it? Though in this fictional world, Mother itself is the ultimate Authority.A Measure of Disorder is unique and surprised me in many ways. My only complaint is that while there was some terrific action and adventure, it didn’t bring me to any highs or lows. The emotional tone of the book felt a little too steady for my taste. But I enjoyed the read, and I was absolutely amazed at the far-reaching effects of the changes taking place in the kids on Mother. Kudos, Mr. Tucker, on a well thought out tale!

  • Tracy Riva
    2018-11-07 10:09

    A Measure of Disorder by Alan Tucker is a wonderful foray into fantasy and imagination. Technically a young adult book, the book is just as likely to appeal to middle-graders as the heroine of the book is a fourteen-year-old eighth grader name Jenni Kershaw.Jenni and her eighth grade science class are on a field to a nearby campground to collect plant samples for a science project. Suddenly, after lunch, the entire class finds themselves going unexpectedly sleepy. A mist rolls over the lake they are picnicking near and when everyone awakes they discover they are now in an alternate reality that is very different from their own.In A Measure of Disorder Jenny and her classmates find themselves surrounded by strange people and new and threatening circumstances. One after another Jenni’s classmates begin to change, some for the better; others for the worse. Then two distinct camps are developed. One wishes to live in peace, but the other seeks the destruction of the peaceable camp. What will the outcome be?What follows is an excerpt from the story, taken from approximately midway through:“Rodrin lowered himself down and returned shortly with a small Nomenstrastenai girl, and a tiny flying Faerstrastenai that immediately sped over to Jenni and landed on her shoulder, hugging her neck.“Oh Jenni! I’m so glad to see you!” the Faerstrastenai said in a soft voice that sounded familiar.Jenni let the hug continue for a few seconds, then offered her hand to step onto so she could see the Faerstrastenai face to face. She apologized and buzzed to Jenni’s hand. Jenni thought first of Rachael, but her features and hair were different.“Deena!” Jenni exclaimed. “Oh my gosh! I wish I could hug you back!”Deena laughed. “Me too.”“Deena, this is Ba’ize. He’s the mayor of Seren’naie.”Deena performed a curtsy in midair and Ba’ize smiled. “A pleasure to meet you Deena,” he said. “And who has come along with you?”“Oh, I’m so sorry!” Deena ushered the girl forward. “This is Feeder, she's from Crank’s village.”The girl sniffled and bowed to both Ba’ize and Jenni. As she straightened, Jenni saw tears in her eyes. She had blond hair, like Crank, and wore a simple tan dress, typical of her people, but it was soiled and torn. She also looked incredibly tired. Jenni then recalled this was the girl she had seen tending the tamed birds in the village while they were there.Jenni looked back to Deena, “What happened? How did you get here?”Deena proceeded to tell the story of the transformations of Mrs. Minch, Mike, and Scott and the subsequent attack on the village. The Gobinstrastorai had arrived and camped around the village for two or three days, then somehow managed to destroy the defense mechanism that protected the Nomenstrastenai. Deena and Feeder had been able to slip out during the battle and hide. The next day when they had seen the devastation of the village, the two had decided to follow the trail of Ms. Pap and the class, and make their way to Seren’naie.”A Measure of Disaster by Alan Tucker, copyright 2010, MAD Design, Inc, 212 Fair Park Drive, billings Montana 59012, author’s website: http://www.mother-earthseries.com Smashwords Edition http://www.smashwords.com ISBN 978-0-9826864-0-9 $3.99

  • CompassBookRatings
    2018-11-09 11:15

    Overall Review: What would your body look like if your appearance reflected your true inner soul? "A Measure of Disorder" has a dreamy, movie-like quality to it, which my mind effortlessly brought to life. It's an entertaining and thoughtful read that leads the reader on a journey to discover an extraordinary "alter" Earth filled with adventure, friends, and self-discovery. I appreciated Tucker's simple detailing, which flowed very smoothly throughout the vast majority of the story, giving the reader just enough structure to let the imagination thrive. However, a few spots felt overwhelmed by detail and were also rushed, and I had to re-read them to fully grasp what was happening. Simplifying these few passages, and aligning them with the flow of the rest of the story would make this a fluid overall read. As an adult, I found that there were a few pieces of the plot and some character development that I found disjointed, but the author's wonderful story-telling overly made up for any minor gaps. What I can say, without a doubt, is that this book will definitely connect with teens (both boys AND girls). Teens will fully identify with the characters in the story, and will find themselves captivated by a remarkably creative adventure. Overall Rating is 4 out of 5 stars. Content Review:PROFANITY: one very mild instanceVIOLENCE: mild instances throughout the entire storySEXUAL CONTENT: NONEMATURE THEMES: mildRECOMMENDED AGE GROUP: 16+I found this book as a whole to have a very "clean read" feel to it. However, there were instances of mild violence throughout the entire story. Examples would be: a character gets "hit square in the chest" with an arrow and falls into a river, a character get bit by an unseen creature and they care for the terrible-looking wound, a dragon relishes in eating bloody deer corpses, characters come in contact with toxic substances that give the open sores, and one character intentionally wounds another with a spike. All of these instances (and the others) are spelled out almost exactly as I have described them above. I found them all mild in nature, but frequent throughout the story. For the reason of frequency, I cannot recommend this as a completely clean read. However, I will say, as this book is a fantasy, it was a very mild read compared to the vast majority of teen/YA fantasy reads. So, in my mind, this is still a great "cleaner" alternative to most of the fantasy books available. Just take into consideration the mild violence throughout, combined with the intended reader, when deciding if this is a good pick four you or your family. I would recommend this book for ages 16+.This Review was written by MelissaA Squeaky Clean Reads Reviewer

  • Dusia
    2018-11-05 06:17

    To start with, I'm a huge fantasy fan. I'm keen on faeries, vampires, werewofles etc. Unfortunately, quite a lot of books are similar: almost the same problems, the same adventures... "Measure of Disorder" is different - in positive way.A group of 14-years-old pupils with some teachers and parents are on a field trip. While coming back, they cross to another world. They don't know what'd happened, have nothing to eat, some of them felt ill... But the meet Crank, an inhabitant of the place. He decides to help them. A big adventure's just started.The style of writing's somehow similar to Trudi Canavan's. Quite a lot of details, natural dialogs. I loved it. The story's structure's alike too. Each chapter describes the situation seen by another person's eyes, which's an interesing solution. An intriguing epilogue makes me think about the continuation.I highly reccomend the book. I can't wait for the next part of the trylogy. I hope it'd be as good as the first part.Good job, Mr. Tucker!

  • Jack
    2018-10-29 10:15

    This was a surprisingly good book. When I first heard about it from the author, I thought it would be geared towards a younger audience. I was pleasantly surprised when it was definitely around my age group, if a year or two below where I am at. The book had an interesting story, but the best part of the book was the world the class found themselves in. By fantasy standards, it wasn't very weird or 'fantastical', yet it had a certain quality that made it seem beautiful and dangerous at the same time. Admittedly, several of the parts were a bit predictable, there were one or two turns that I didn't see coming. However, the pros outweighed the cons.Pros:FreeGood storyGood worldSemi-good/interesting charactersAn ending that tied up enough to leave you satisfied but still leaving room for a sequelCons:Predictable at timesSome annoying charactersHardly any diversity in terms of wildlife and inhabitantsQuite feminineFinal rating: 4 stars.

  • Julie Powell
    2018-10-26 09:05

    I knew from the beginning I was going to love this story - well written, great characters and fabulous originality!It starts with a group of teenagers on a school field trip - ordinary, everyday, yes - until...I don't give spoilers but will say that this is a delightful, insightful, energising read, in-built with messages about Nature and how things will only become worse for Earth if things don't change. This is cleverly done within a wonderfully imaginative created fantasy world, where descriptions bring it alive - that and the cast of great characters (some unusual, some bad, some good some...unexpected).Highly recommended - and yes, I am already reading book two in the series.

  • Logan Robinson
    2018-11-04 10:04

    When my step-dad Stace asked me about reading "A Measure of Disorder" to review it and give my feedback, I was a little apprehensive. He told me it was more toward females, but I really didn't mind. I read through it, all 200-something pages, and it was fantastic! I must say that I'm honored to be acknowledged in the book, and I'm glad I got the opportunity to read this before the majority of people. :)

  • Stephani
    2018-11-17 07:03

    What can I honestly say? Alan Tucker has one heck of an imagination. I loved every part of this book. It was well written and alot of fun. I cant say too much because I dont want to ruin it for those of you who havent read it yet!!! Fantastic!!!! I am now itching to get my fingers on books two and three of the mother earth series!!!!!!

  • London
    2018-10-26 04:05

    Jenna and her classmates are magically transported to another world on their field trip. There they find fantasies beyond their imagination, and they find they all play a part in this new world. Mother Earth sent them there for a reason, but will they be successful? A very sweet, interesting book that will soothe anyone's need for a unique fantasy.

  • Nina Gayle
    2018-11-11 04:15

    I received this book for free through Goodreads First Reads. What I enjoyed best about this book is its originality. A group of 14-year-olds on a class field trip and their chaperones are not only transported to another world, but transformed into other beings.This is a book I know my middle school students would enjoy reading.

  • Natalia P.o.
    2018-10-29 07:01

    The Mother Earth series were REALLY good. When I read the first book I just HAD to read the next two. Every page of all the three books were worth my time. This series was one of the best I've ever read. I really liked how the author came up with all those kinds of creatures. Very impressive.

  • Linda
    2018-11-07 11:15

    A different twist to a fantasy adventure. Very imaginative writing. I highly recommend this for youngadults as well as adults. It was one I did not want to put down until I finished. Very original.

  • Frederick
    2018-10-26 09:14

    I liked the characterization of most of the cast, not to mention the protagonist is made sympathetic after everything that happens to her. The author does a good job of worldbuilding for a YA series. Despite downloading this book for free, I may have to go through the rest of the series!

  • Clyde
    2018-11-11 05:14

    This YA book about teenagers having an extraordinary adventure quite surprised me. I read a few pages on a whim and then just dropped all other books until I finished it. I am not in the target demographic, but this old codger quite enjoyed the story.

  • Mercedes
    2018-11-10 10:08

    This book is right up my alley... well worded and caters well to the young community. I highly reccommend it!

  • Kerry Fine
    2018-10-22 08:52

    This was a beautiful story! I love that it's different than most of the teen fantasy available right now; in fact, it reminds me of some of the classics.

  • Read for your future!
    2018-11-12 09:06

    Read Patti's Review at:http://readforyourfuture.blogspot.com...

  • Kate
    2018-11-09 10:14

    This book was amazing! One of the best I have read in a long time! And right now it is free for the Amazon Kindle. Give it a shot, you won't be disappointed!

  • Rea
    2018-11-10 08:16

    It was strange but awesomely strange!

  • Sher A. Hart
    2018-11-17 07:51

    I started this book a couple of years ago and got interrupted early on. Then I got busy and forgot. Usually, if I forget a book, it’s forgettable. However, this was case of bad timing, during a move. I’m a farmer now with a house on 2.5 acres, and one day I went exploring the woods down by our spring. That reminded me of Mother Earth in the blurb for this book. So in spite of my huge TBR pile, I went searching through my Kindle until I saw the title again. Whoa, not a forgettable story once I got past the field trip and the mist where I stopped the first time. Don’t make the same mistake!What I liked: Mother Earth as a sentient being was my favorite. I still have an unfinished manuscript of my own with the same idea, but Tucker’s is very different in manifestation, the balance concept, and lots of other ways, like how the planet changes humans and vice versa. The world building also impressed me; it’s very inventive. In addition, even though the story pressed my ability to believe, it's well paced and difficult to predict, so the tension stays tight where needed. I enjoyed the surprises.Tucker also developed characters of a large cast of adults and kids well enough that I rarely had to ask myself “who is that?” The environmental aspects and moral issues enriched the experience. The main battle and story arc completed, and even though the villain got away, the end left me intrigued rather than feeling cheated like so many series books do. 5 stars for those aspects. What I didn’t like (but shouldn’t stop anyone from reading): Since the beginning sort of bounced between omniscient and distant third, I thought it was going to be the same throughout. Then quite a ways in, a chapter used another character’s point of view, and then another and another. After I got over the shock, I wondered why the author didn’t just give all the key characters a section or two much earlier. I prefer close third person over omniscient because it’s easier to identify with the main character, but rotating third person starting with the main character and the others soon after would have made me like or dislike each much earlier and made for a more consistent format.A bigger problem was the editing or lack thereof. I stopped to make error notes way more often than I should have. Subtract one star.Overall, the story was a rare treat, so I recommend it to anyone who’s tired of formulaic books and looking for something both different and exciting. I think I won a copy of the book or got it in a military tribute long ago; I can’t remember, but I did not receive a free copy in exchange for an honest review. In fact, this is the first time in years I’ve read a book without a review request, but I wouldn’t give a dishonest review anyway. 4 of 5 stars. So congratulations to the author for a series I would revisit in a heartbeat if not for my TBR pile.

  • Harmony Kent
    2018-10-25 04:12

    I picked this book up free on Amazon.28th October 20133 out of 5 StarsABOUT THE BOOK:"High school will be a breeze for Jenni Kershaw - if she lives long enough to enroll, that is. Jenni's ordinary, eighth grade life becomes a thing of the past when her science class goes on a field trip. Armed with only their notebooks, MP3 players, and wits, Jenni and her classmates are unknowingly transported to another world. There they encounter amazing creatures, some of which think a kid shish kebab would be a tasty treat. But they soon find the greatest dangers they face may come from themselves ... Follow Jenni and her class on their extraordinary adventures in their fight to discover who - and what - they really are."MY THOUGHTS:This book is aimed at the younger adult reader, and is in the genre of fantasy fiction. Its main premise is allegorical, with the students and teachers transforming into creatures and elements that represent what they are truly like within. A nice new twist within this genre. The pace starts off somewhat slowly, and remains slow for the majority of the book, only picking up pace in the last 25% to 30%. I had to work hard to stay with it at first, but feel that by the end of the book my efforts paid off. THE STRUCTURE:The book is approximately 350 pages in length, and from chapter to chapter changes its POV - although there are a number of times that the reader is forcibly head hopped into an entirely different character without due warning. There are a number of minor copy editing and proof reading issues that could do with addressing. On the whole the book is well presented and clear.SUMMARY:With a little polishing and tidying up I might be inclined to give this book a soft 4 stars, but as it stands I can only offer a 3. This is a good, gentle and clean book for the younger adult reader. The pacing could be a little faster from earlier in the book. A book that's worth buying, if not too highly priced, but not one that I found particularly memorable or engrossing.

  • Jerry Newhouse
    2018-10-31 09:12

    This is book one in the Mother Earth series. It turns out to be an excellent mix of sc–fi, fantasy and a tale for young adults. This is a great read for teenagers. There are lots of adventure and personal growth in the characters. A strange new world to explore, but not too outlandish like some fantasy. One very important point that needs to be brought up, she has a pronunciation guide in the very back of the book. I wished I would have noticed it before, but I managed to guess most of the names correctly any ways.This story is an adventure by a class of high school students out on a Biology field trip. Things go wrong from the beginning. I really liked how the author slowly introduced the elements of the new world so the reader isn’t overwhelmed with trying to suddenly create a whole new world all in one shot. It actually reads as a mystery novel, at first—trying to put all the pieces together. As I don’t want to tell the whole story and ruin the surprises within, I will say that it is a truly delightful adventure and I am looking forward to reading the rest of the books in the series.

  • Brooke Johnson
    2018-11-22 04:01

    It wasn't that the story was bad or anything. It was well written and interesting, just not interesting enough. I didn't really care about the characters or what was happening to them. The only character I liked was Crank, but still nothing much happened with him. The story also seemed disjointed and like it wasn't going anywhere. I didn't get a sense of a plot or anything, and I made it halfway through the book. I decided not to finish it because I just wasn't invested in it. Others may disagree.