Read Blaze of Noon by Rayner Heppenstall Online

blaze-of-noon

Written in subtle, elegant prose, this rediscovered classic, first published in 1939, addresses issues of psychology and perception, while pioneering avant-garde narrative techniquesWhen the blind narrator, the masseur Louis Dunkel, moves into the Cornwall country house of his patient Mrs. Nance, he becomes fascinated by her niece Sophie, a haughty young woman. Their resulWritten in subtle, elegant prose, this rediscovered classic, first published in 1939, addresses issues of psychology and perception, while pioneering avant-garde narrative techniquesWhen the blind narrator, the masseur Louis Dunkel, moves into the Cornwall country house of his patient Mrs. Nance, he becomes fascinated by her niece Sophie, a haughty young woman. Their resulting romance, however, is unsettled by the arrival of the blind, deaf, and dumb Amity Nance. The introspective Dunkel tries to interpret and negotiate the pitfalls of a difficult and at times hostile environment....

Title : Blaze of Noon
Author :
Rating :
ISBN : 9780805280609
Format Type : Hardcover
Number of Pages : 176 Pages
Status : Available For Download
Last checked : 21 Minutes ago!

Blaze of Noon Reviews

  • MJ Nicholls
    2019-01-18 09:58

    Buried author Rayner Heppenstall’s debut novel is cited (in this intro) as one of the first nouveau roman texts—an accident, since the blind narrator’s dismissal of visual description is something of a necessity, and the French novelists failed to acknowledge this novel as an influence. The resemblance is irrelevant (and inaccurate), as this is a more conventional novel told in blazing first-person prose, brimming with marvellous sensual description and a feast of sublime characterisation and erudite ruminations on the flightiness of human emotions, in the kind of profound and intellectual prose that is truly a relic in comparison to the ham-fisted Dear Aunt pokings of modern writers. The maturity, utter lack of sentiment and melodrama that marks this writing is a hallmark of a bygone era, and reading brilliance like this simply makes one lament for those bygone days, and dread whatever affectless postpostmodern soup these whippersnores are serving us up as the future of fic. Shovels at the ready.

  • Jonathan
    2018-12-26 12:44

    All texts are experimental, for one can never know for certain how they will turn out. Nor, indeed, can one ever know how one's writing will re-form in the mind of a Reader. So, yes, this is an experimental novel. Even more so when one remembers it was written at the time of the Munich crisis. It was considered scandalous at the time, though it is less erotic and less explicit than much contemporary Young Adult fiction. The narrator is blind, though he was not born so. He suffered a loss in his late teenage years. The world of the novel has its visual element removed, and the narrative is limited to the internal reality of the narrator. This makes him an outsider, and unreliable. Descriptions of objects intertwine with complex intellectual reflection, there are lines of great lyrical beauty. It is a masterfully written novel, which deserves a wide readership. It sits on the fence somewhere between the avant-guard and the traditional and, in my opinion, would bring great pleasure to fans of either or of both.

  • Seth Lynch
    2019-01-03 08:43

    An enjoyable book with some beautiful passages. Some ideas in it are a little dated although they were probably progressive at the time