Read Wildmen, WobbliesWhistle Punks: Stewart Holbrook's Lowbrow Northwest by Brian Booth Stewart Hall Holbrook Online

wildmen-wobblieswhistle-punks-stewart-holbrook-s-lowbrow-northwest

Here are the best of Holbrook's colorful and irreverent accounts of the region's history, from forgotten scandals and murders to stories of forest fires and floods and tales of loggers and life in the logging camps....

Title : Wildmen, WobbliesWhistle Punks: Stewart Holbrook's Lowbrow Northwest
Author :
Rating :
ISBN : 9780870713835
Format Type : Paperback
Number of Pages : 320 Pages
Status : Available For Download
Last checked : 21 Minutes ago!

Wildmen, WobbliesWhistle Punks: Stewart Holbrook's Lowbrow Northwest Reviews

  • jeremy
    2018-11-19 11:50

    the great stewart holbrook was a storytelling titan and remains one of the most important writers in pacific northwest history. wildmen, wobblies & whistle punks is a career-spanning collection of over two dozen pieces set mostly in holbrook's beloved oregon. comfortable writing about nearly anything, his true tales often dealt with the fantastic, the forgotten, and the forlorn. like h.l. mencken, his contemporary and friend, holbrook stood up for the marginalized working man and exposed the hypocrisies of the ruling classes. holbrook could seemingly make any topic interesting with his easy blend of humor, character, and lively prose. wildmen, wobblies & whistle punks contains some truly unbelievable stories about the tillamook burn (355,000 acres of old growth forest fire), the 1942 aerial bombing of brookings, oregon by the japanese, the 1903 heppner flood (deadliest natural disaster in state history), and the late nineteenth century practice of "crimping" drunken patrons from portland saloons. replete with a dizzying and rugged array of sensational characters including railroad moguls, anarchists, murderers, tavern owners, lumberjacks, communists, robber barons, prophets, cattle kings, outlaws, and prostitutes, this collection will intrigue anyone with even the remotest interest in the pacific northwest or neglected american history. yet the supporters of this and of other myths are not to be charged with fabricating. they are merely poets, poets seeking to fasten a measure of that mysterious thing we call art to an event or a thing that is graceless without it.

  • Melody
    2018-12-09 16:03

    Unfairly forgotten primo Northwest writer who has an unsparing eye and a sensitive BS detector. Funny, exciting, poignant and highly recommended, especially if you live in the Pacific Northwest. Loggers and anarchists, murderers and crazies, all here, all beautifully explicated.

  • Micah
    2018-11-27 11:01

    Love. Love. Love. Obsessed, even.Holbrook's storytelling takes the reader from the three madams of Portland's brothels, through the fear and realities of entire towns' destruction in the wake of fire and flood all the way to the tales of lumberjacks, the front-runner of civilization as European populations spread west.I want to get a Holbrooks tattoo. That is how in love I am with this collection and his style.Here is one of his stories for your reading pleasure: http://theforestandthesea.wordpress.c...

  • Sarahbee
    2018-12-03 17:43

    I so enjoyed this book, not only for the topics of life in logging camps, bars in Portland, madams and Wobblies, but a whole lot of stories inbetween. I loved Holbrook's writing - so concise and entertaining. I highly recommend this book.

  • Doug Robinson
    2018-11-11 14:57

    Would love to find more literature on the early days of Pacific Northwest logging towns and communities. This book has definitely piqued my interest!

  • Ben
    2018-11-30 09:54

    This book was great! Holbrook captures 'slice of life' stories with great reverence towards the characters and places contained in them. This book almost feels like a PNW proto version of Howard Zinn's "A People's History." This is a book that I will want to read again so I can learn to retell some of the stories while sitting around campfires or walking through tall stands of Doug Fir trees.

  • Wes
    2018-11-15 16:00

    A wonderful collection of stories about the Northwest, particularly Portland, OR. The city has history and it is a sordid one. If you have been to the city then read this and learn some storied about the places that you have been. Or, just read it to get a peek into the auspicious character of Holbrook.

  • Matt
    2018-11-25 10:51

    Stewart Holbrook died in Portland in 1964, having become America's foremost chronicler of and commentator on the Pacific Northwest. He was a drunk, a painter, a self-promoting prankster, and above all, a profiteer.

  • Wolter
    2018-11-22 10:56

    Interesting

  • Gen Schaack
    2018-11-16 11:51

    This book is amazing. It's strange that the editor is given author credit on this. Stewart Holbrook wrote all the parts worth reading in this book. Go read it. Now.