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Before Enigma During the First World War, a British code-cracking team paved the way for the successful code-breaking of the Second world War. Many of those most closely involved in cracking the Enigma code – Alistair Denniston, Frank Birch, Dilly Knox – had wrestled with German naval codes for most of the First World War. By the end of the war they had been successfully Before EnigmaDuring the First World War, a British code-cracking team paved the way for the successful code-breaking of the Second world War. Many of those most closely involved in cracking the Enigma code – Alistair Denniston, Frank Birch, Dilly Knox – had wrestled with German naval codes for most of the First World War. By the end of the war they had been successfully cracking a new code every day, from their secret Room 40 at the Old Admiralty Building, in a London blacked out for Zeppelin Raids. The techniques they developed then, the ideas that they came to rely on, the people they came to trust, had been developed the hard way, under intense pressure and absolute secrecy during the First World War. Operation PrimroseOperation Primrose tells the story of the capture of U-110 – and with it a working Enigma machine. One of the biggest secrets of the war, the capture of that one machine turned the tide of the war. Turing and his colleagues at Bletchley Park worked tirelessly to crack the code, and with the working Enigma machine they finally had their break-through moment. This book sets the story, and the Enigma cryptographers, in context – at the heart of the Battle of the Atlantic, when it reached its crescendo in the pursuit of the battleship Bismarck the week after U110 was taken. It sets Bletchley Park in its wider context too, at the heart of an intricate and maverick network of naval intelligence, tracking signals and plotting them to divert convoys around waiting U-boats, involving officers like James Bond’s future creator, Ian Fleming. It also sets out the most important context of all, forgotten in so much of the Enigma history: that Britain’s own naval code had already been cracked, and its signals were being read, thanks to the efforts of Turing’s opposite number, the German naval cryptographer, Wilhelm Tranow. An exciting and enthralling true story ‘Operation Primrose’ is an excellently researched piece on the race for naval supremacy in the Second World War. Alan TuringMathematician, philosopher, codebreaker. Turing was one of the most original thinkers of the last century - and the man whose work helped create the computer-driven world we now inhabit. But he was also an enigmatic figure, deeply reticent yet also strikingly naïve. Turing’s openness about his homosexuality at a time when it was an imprisonable offence ultimately led to his untimely death at the age of only forty-one. Alan Turing: Unlocking the Enigma seeks to find the man behind the science, illuminating the life of a person who is still a shadowy presence behind his brilliant achievements. Turing was instrumental in cracking the Nazi Enigma machines at the top secret code breaking establishment at Bletchley Park during the Second World War. But his achievements were to be tragically overshadowed by his supposedly subversive views and for his sexuality. Praise for David Boyle:‘The tone of the book may be gloomy but there is plenty of entertainment value …’ - Anne Ashworth, The Times ‘Exhilarating’ - Daily Mail ‘He tells these stories, on the whole persuasively and with some startling asides....

Title : enigmas alan turing and the codebreakers of the world wars
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ISBN : 34324005
Format Type : Kindle Edition
Number of Pages : 213 Pages
Status : Available For Download
Last checked : 21 Minutes ago!

enigmas alan turing and the codebreakers of the world wars Reviews

  • Bonnye Reed
    2018-11-19 17:15

    GNA I received a free electronic copy of this history from Netgalley, David Boyle, and Endeavour Press in exchange for an honest review. Thank you all, for sharing your hard work with me. I found it fascinating that the code breakers of the First World War were essential to the success of the code breakers of the Second World War. And that the life of Alan Turing, as short as it was, resulted in establishing so much of the world as we know it, today. This is an excellent who-done-it for those interested in codes and computers and even the growing world-wide acceptance of the LGBT community. This is a book that will go on my research shelf, one I will want to read again at my leisure. pub date Feb 23, 2017rec Feb 22, 2017

  • Lloyd Liggett
    2018-11-21 17:17

    Having spent around 22 years involved in the "Codebreaking" business, I was already very familiar with the many stories about "ENIGMA", and already knew a lot regarding Alan Turing and his contributions toward "codebreaking and the birth of the computer. This series of books filled in some rather wide gaps I had on these subjects. I, once, visited Betchley Park in a semi-professional status, and the present home of the British "codebreakers in Cheltenham. This was all in the early-middle 50's, these series of Boyle's books were great background info. Previously, I knew very little about their role in the First World War, so this was an important source for me about that period, and kinda how it all got started. We, The USA, learned much of our "expertise from the British, and worked, extremely, closely together during the "Cold War". Since I retired from that line of wok in 1970, the changes have been unimaginable, but I try to keep up with what's available to the general public. Mr. Boyle's books were a valuable adjunct for me. Anyone who is interested in the subject of codebreaking and/or the birth of the computer would benefit from reading these books.

  • Diana
    2018-11-26 16:19

    Book received from NetGalley.Very short book on code breaking at Bletchley Park starting with its beginnings in World War I and the more famous code breakers of World War II. This is the first book I have read about codebreakers though I know a little about them from their service during the Second World War. I especially liked hearing about how it started, I had no idea there were people working on the same thing back in World War I. Some of the things about the subject during World War II may be a bit of a rehash on the subject for those who have already read books on it, I don't really think there is much new material on that era out there to find. It was a quick little book and I liked finding out more about the history of this subject.

  • Bookreaderljh
    2018-11-12 10:23

    This is really a set of 3 books but they are all related and fairly short so I will treat them as Kindle treated them. I got interested in the subject of the code breaking of the German Enigma in WWII after "Dead Wake" which examined the sinking of the Lusitania in WWI. The first book of this series repeats a lot of that story (as far as how the British went about cracking the German codes) during WWI. But learned more about how people from all different walks of life worked on the project under the direction of Blinker Hall. So with the history of codebreaking set - these books move onto Turing (who became involved before WWII) and the Enigma machine that the Germans invented. The second book was very interesting as to how an Enigma machine fell into British hands and how Britain had to somewhat cover that up but with the machine Turing and others were able to fast track code breaking to give the British an advantage. The final story is more about Turing the man and his persecution due to being homosexual but his genius in developing computers and beginning theories of AI. The book suggests his death probably was a suicide made to look like an accident. The witch hunts of those years could be fatal!! One point - the Germans had their own story of breaking British codes and succeeded earlier but not as fast. The stories good but often hard to follow the science and the characters and the author's writing style did not help.

  • Walt
    2018-11-13 17:28

    A Bit Disjointed Interesting, most especially the third section which is about Turing. The first section and the second are difficult to follow. I feel the story is not as well developed as it could be. I'm most interested in Turing and the third section is enjoyable reading.