Read Canada Year by Year by Elizabeth MacLeod Sydney Smith Online

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"Award-winning author Elizabeth MacLeod's year-by-year tour of Canada's fascinating history highlights a single milestone for every year from the country's founding in 1867 up to its 150th anniversary in 2017. Divided into ten distinct eras, coverage ranges from politics, sports, business and arts and culture, and includes significant events both at home and in world affai"Award-winning author Elizabeth MacLeod's year-by-year tour of Canada's fascinating history highlights a single milestone for every year from the country's founding in 1867 up to its 150th anniversary in 2017. Divided into ten distinct eras, coverage ranges from politics, sports, business and arts and culture, and includes significant events both at home and in world affairs."--...

Title : Canada Year by Year
Author :
Rating :
ISBN : 9781771383974
Format Type : Hardcover
Number of Pages : 96 Pages
Status : Available For Download
Last checked : 21 Minutes ago!

Canada Year by Year Reviews

  • Kris - My Novelesque Life
    2019-01-19 09:34

    CANADA YEAR BY YEARWritten by Elizabeth MacLeodIllustrated by Sydney Smith2016; 96 Pages (Kids Can Press) (I received an ARC from the EDELWEISS)Rating: 5 STARS"Elizabeth MacLeod's year-by-year tour of Canada's fascinating history highlights a single milestone for every year from the country's founding in 1867 up to its 150th anniversary in 2017. Divided into ten distinct eras, coverage ranges from politics, sports, business and arts and culture, and includes significant events both at home and in world affairs." (From Publishers)This is a great book for anyone wanting to know more about Canada. I think it should be in every school library as it is a easy book to want to read and know more about history. The illustrations are great and remind me a bit of Quentin Blake.

  • Laura
    2018-12-22 11:23

    Quick, if you are not Canadian, how much Canadian history can you tell me? And you can't go look up old Kate Beaton's Hark, A Vigilant cartoons either.As an American, other than what I have learned from reading Kate Beaton, and reading on my own, I found that I really didn't have much Canadian history under my belt. And did all you non-Canadian's know that next year will be the 150th anniversary of their founding?This is a very assessable little volume. It is not overly preachy, nor does it talk down to you. The author has picked one event per year to highlight, including nobel prize winners, olympic champions, and inventions. Nor does it shy away from issues such as the treatment of the First Nation people. The founding of the Indian act is mentioned, as well as the Residential schools apology. We learn who the first provinces who made up Canada were, as well as that Nunavut is the most recent province formed.Highly recommended for just about everyone. Written at a middle-school to high school level, with great illustrations.Thanks to Netgalley and Kids Can Press for making this book available for an honest review.

  • Wayne McCoy
    2018-12-31 09:34

    'Canada Year by Year' by Elizabeth MacLeod with illustrations by Sydney Smith is a younger readers overview of the history of Canada, and it's timed for next year's 150th anniversary.The book has 10 chapters for distinct eras. Every year gets a paragraph of notable events or history. Topics include everything from politics to sports and culture. The famous Canadians that aren't featured in the book get mentioned in an appendix at the end.Starting with the birth of the country on July 1st, 1867, we learn about the fathers of confederation, the Fenian raids, British home children, women's rights, indigenous people's rights, the fight for English or French to be the main language. We learn about the invention of basketball, the telephone, the Canadarm, and indoor hockey. We learn about the contributions of Canadian armed forces in the world wars and more recently in Afghanistan.Every year can't be covered in such a concise manner, but the breadth of things covered is impressive. As someone who lives in the US, I'm not as familiar with Canadian history, so I learned quite a few things. Controversial topics are not shied away from, and are covered and presented pretty neutrally. It's funny that the last entry is for 2017, as I read this in 2016, and it's also written in the past tense, but I assume that's for future readers. The illustrations and layout of this book are great. The pages are broken up in interesting ways and there are trivia facts and quotes along with the caricature style of illustration.I received a review copy of this ebook from Kids Can Press and NetGalley in exchange for an honest review. Thank you for allowing me to review this ebook.

  • Lisa Day
    2019-01-04 09:33

    From the day of Confederation to the celebrations that will mark Canada's 150th birthday July 1, Canada Year by Year offers a look at a major milestone in this nation's past in each of the 150 years. Funnily enough, I always flip to 1910 when the first chocolate bar was invented in the Ganong chocolate factory in St. Stephen, New Brunswick, which is now considered Chocolate Town. It's aptly named as the museum is worth the drive as there are literally buckets of chocolate waiting for you to sample. But I digress. Each entry is only a couple of paragraphs long giving you enough information to understand the importance of the event. There is addition information such as Did you know, or life in the trenches (in the First World War) or profile on important people such as John McCrae, who wrote In Flanders Fields.

  • HueL
    2019-01-20 14:37

    Great illos by Sydney smith

  • Amy Lafleur
    2019-01-09 13:41

    Even growing up in the United States only a couple of hours from the Canadian border, I still feel as if I haven't learned much about Canadian history. Canada was only touched on in school with learning the names of provinces and territories. I was thrilled to find this children's Canadian history book at one of the public libraries in my county.This very accessible isn't a comprehensive history but rather tells the history of Canada from 1867 (when Canada officially became a country)-2017 through bite-size true stories of important events or people for each year. The book is broken up into clear ranges of years such as the early years of the country, WWI years, new millennium etc. and introduces the range of history. Stories range from about science or technological discoveries, sports, entertainment, and social issues and movements. The stories seem to encompass a wide range of Canada's provinces, territories, and people. Along the way are many little illustrations of the notable people, places, events, and things as well as little inset profiles of various important Canadians. In the back of the book is a section of "Great Canadians" with brief few sentence biographies of notable Canadians not previously mentioned in the book and a few illustrations of them.I found it amusing that even though the book is published in late 2016, it includes 2017, but mostly as a chance to remind readers that Canadians will celebrate the 150th anniversary of their nationhood. This book is geared toward middle grade and early middle school though I would recommend it to both kids or adults, anyone who is curious to learn more about Canada. Excellent overview of Canadian history!

  • Carla Johnson-Hicks
    2019-01-07 10:20

    Being a Canadian, I am not happy that we are basically known for snow, hockey, Tim Hortons and the RCMP. This book changes that and gives short vignettes of Canadian history. The author has picked one event per year to highlight (this was probably not easy to do), including Nobel prize winners, Olympic champions, government firsts, women's rights as well as inventions. The founding of the Indian act is mentioned, as well as the Residential schools apology. The reader will find out about the provinces, when they joined the country and what is the name of the newest territory (yes, Canada has provinces and territories). Did you know that basketball was invented in Canada, so was the goalie mask. In this amazing book readers will learn about the great history of Canada told through pictures and print. Perfect for anyone doing research on the country for a visit or for a project or just to learn more about this great country. It is written at a middle school level but could be read and enjoyed by any age from 9 and up. There are wonderful illustrations to add to the book as well as a short biography of many famous Canadians at the back. Happy 150th Birthday Canada. This would be a great book to have in all school libraries both in Canada and around the world.I received a copy of this book from the publisher through Netgalley in exchange for an honest review.

  • Teena in Toronto
    2019-01-20 12:31

    This book provides chunks of information about Canada, for 150 years starting in 1867 right up to 2017. The sections are:* Introduction: a country is born* A new country: 1867-84* Canada grows: 1885-99* A new century: 1900-1913* Wartime and beyond: 19144-28* The great depressions: 1929-38* Return to war: 1939-53* Boom years: 1954-66* Happy birthday!: 1967-79* The digital age: 1980-99* A new millennium: 2000-17* Great CanadiansThe book chooses one topic to highlight every year since 1867 and covers in politics, sports, entertainment, people, space, wars, nationalities, etc. There are also side notes for some years. The year I was born discusses the changes in immigration laws (you don't have to have a sponsor but could live here if you have the required education, skill or other qualifications).Though it is written for children, I found this book interesting and not childish or immature. The tidbits were short enough to keep my attention but told me enough. The accompanying drawings were cute.Blog review post: http://www.teenaintoronto.com/2016/09...

  • Nicole
    2018-12-22 14:26

    Full ReviewCanada Year by Year by Elizabeth MacLeod is a wonderful non=fictional book about Canada. The book gives facts from the start of when Canada became a country in 1867 to 2017 when Canada turns 150 years old. The author has picked one event per year to highlight, which includes Nobel prize winners, Olympic champions, government firsts, women’s rights as well as inventions.Readers will learn about Canadian history through pictures and text. It is perfect for learning about Canadian history whether for being more knowledgable about the country, or doing research for a school project. The book is written in a middle school level but any age from 9 and up will enjoy this informative book about Canada. The illustrations are wonderful and add to the text. In the back of the book there is a biography section about famous Canadians. I would love to have this book part of my classroom library.I received a copy of this book from Kids Can Press through Netgalley in exchange for an honest review.

  • Amanda Sanders
    2019-01-15 07:43

    This is a good reference source on Canada. It is a timeline of Canadian history from its beginning on July 1, 1867 to the upcoming 150 year anniversary in 2017. It includes famous people (Alexander Graham Bell), politics, and general facts. Canada gave women the right to vote in 1918--2 years before the US and they elected the first female prime minister in 1993. They beat the US for women in politics. Canada has some history similar to the US: breaking treaties with natives, using Chinese rail workers to build a transcontinental railroad and gold rushes. The first chocolate bar was invented in New Brunswick in 1910. Thank you very much Canada! We appreciate you. This book is a fun way to learn about Canadian history.

  • TDCbookreviews
    2018-12-23 14:37

    Beautiful capture of Canadian history. Very kid friendly - lots of photos, easy to read. Even helpful for adults as it gives a very good summary to the major (and minor) points throughout 150 years of rich events and the people involved in them. Filled with "content such as short biographies, quotes, important firsts and trivia" that are divided up chronologically, a perfect reference for brushing up on your history, making up tests/quizzes if needed or, a good read if one is wanting more information to be proud of such a great country. 5/5 maple leafs!

  • Stewart
    2018-12-25 09:21

    Canada Year by Year is a very good and accessible history book for children. It gives brief glimpses of important historical events and facts from the Great White North. The illustrations provide a bit of interest between topics and I think it is written well enough that most children would not get bored by the content. Definitely worth checking out.Disclaimer: I received a free electronic copy from Netgalley for my opinion.

  • Tara
    2018-12-27 07:43

    Many people know about Canada. It's the country up north, it's cold there and people play hockey. There is so much more to know about Canada, like that basketball was invented there or that the goalie mask was first created there. In this amazing book readers will learn about the great history of Canada told through pictures and print. Perfect for anyone doing research on the country for a visit or for a project.

  • Barbra
    2018-12-30 10:26

    This book contains the birth and life of Canada from 1867 to 2017 when it’s 150 year will be celebrated. Each chapter contains milestones in Canadian history and important people profiles. Easy to read yearly entries and Did You Know facts make this book a must have for school curriculum and young historians from ages eight to 12.

  • Liz
    2019-01-17 11:20

    I won a copy of this book in a Goodreads giveaway.This is a great way to learn about the history and culture of Canada. I know it is aimed at kids but, after they had read it, I picked it up myself. I now know so much more about this interesting country. A quick and enlightening read.

  • Niki
    2018-12-22 07:23

    Note: I received an eARC of this text via NetGalley (and it is now in print, as well).Elizabeth MacLeod has compiled an extensive, interesting, and non-partisan history of Canada. The large picture-book format book is laid out with chronological snippets of Canadian history. As an adult, I found it interesting to read the book in it's entirety, but I wonder somewhat about how children, the intended audience, will read this book. A criticism could be that the somewhat random chronological snippets would make researching a particular event or time period somewhat difficult. However, the accessible text and interesting writing-style make this a great book about Canada. I also thought that MacLeod handled many of the less than stellar parts of Canadian history, like the treatment of Aboriginal peoples, very well.

  • PWRL
    2019-01-01 15:33

    SM

  • Andréa
    2019-01-05 14:44

    Note: I received access to a digital ARC of this book through NetGalley and Edelweiss.