Read the works of sir thomas malory 3rd edition 3 volumes by Thomas Malory Eugène Vinaver P.J.C. Field Online

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This third edition of Vinaver's superbly annotated text of the Works provides a factually corrected version of the second edition, including reverified text and apparatus consisting of some 2,850 changes, and a completely revised index and glossary. In addition to the new changes, the volume offers the standard format of the previous two editions, including a definitive biThis third edition of Vinaver's superbly annotated text of the Works provides a factually corrected version of the second edition, including reverified text and apparatus consisting of some 2,850 changes, and a completely revised index and glossary. In addition to the new changes, the volume offers the standard format of the previous two editions, including a definitive biography and literary interpretation of Malory, an essay describing the texts on which the edition was established, the Caxton printing, a lucid and highly readable introduction, full critical apparatus, and numerous relevant quotes from unpublished sources....

Title : the works of sir thomas malory 3rd edition 3 volumes
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ISBN : 17704337
Format Type : Hardcover
Number of Pages : 1915 Pages
Status : Available For Download
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the works of sir thomas malory 3rd edition 3 volumes Reviews

  • Neil
    2018-11-07 04:56

    Eugene Vinaver was a Russian medieval scholar who was born in Saint Petersburg in 1899. Vinaver's family moved to Paris in 1919 due to the Russian Revolution, thus giving Vinaver the chance to study under the eminent French medievalist, Joseph Bedier. In the late 1920s Vinaver moved to England and became the professor of French Language and Literature at the University of Manchester. Vinaver also founded the Arthuriania journal, which would later be renamed Medium Aevum. By 1929 Vinaver had publish an Oxford monograph on Malory and had begun work on a new scholarly edition of Caxton's Malory print, which due to events about to unfold, would soon be abandoned. In 1934 the headmaster of Winchester College, W. F. Oakeshott had discovered an unknown copy of a Malory manuscript while cataloguing the Winchester library. Upon inspection of the Winchester Malory, both Oakeshott and Vinaver came to the conclusion that the manuscript was closer to Malory's original than the Caxton print. While Oakeshott was encouraged to produce his own edition of the new find, the task of editing was eventually given to Vinaver.Vinaver's edition of the text was finally published in 1947 by Oxford's Clarendon Press imprint in three volumes and immediately became the standard scholarly edition. The book was revised and republished in a 1967 second edition and then much abridged in the Oxford Standard Authors Series in a single volume edition.In 1991 a third edition was needed and due to Vinaver's death, the new edition was revised by Arthurian scholar Peter Field, well know for his study of Malory's style in Romance and Chronicle and his biographical sketch of Malory in The Life and Times of Malory, plus numerous published scholarly articles. Field states in his preface that revisions to Vinaver's own sections are kept to a minimum and only makes factual corrections because he wishes to leave the work essentially still by Vinaver. The text of the manuscript itself is a different matter, Field makes over two thousand changes to the text that reflect modern editorial policy.The format of the book remains the same as the first and second editions. First there's the prefaces, with a new one by field, followed by the familiar introduction in which Vinaver gives his theories on Malory, Caxton and the Winchester manuscript. The text of the Winchester manuscript is then given with variant readings from the Caxton print in the footnotes. The third volume is the real anoraks delight because of the line by line critical commentary and exploration of Malory's source material. The ending of the book is taken up by an index of characters, G. L. Brook's glossary and an afterward by Peter Field.With numerous failed attempts by other publishing companies to produce a version of Malory that will knock this off the top spot, this three volume revision still remains the academic standard that everyone chooses to read. Whether or not this will remain the case after the publication of Field's own version that is to be published at the end of this year remains to be seen.