Read Moneywood: Hollywood in Its Last Age of Excess by William Stadiem Online

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As wild and sexy and over the top as the decade it brings to life, author, William Stadiem, tells the inside story of Hollywood producers in the 80s.From hits like Beverly Hills Cop, Top Gun and Batman to flops like Heaven's Gate, Howard the Duck and Leonard Part 6, Hollywood was never more excessive than it was in the 1980s. In this, the Moneywood era, the purse strings wAs wild and sexy and over the top as the decade it brings to life, author, William Stadiem, tells the inside story of Hollywood producers in the 80s.From hits like Beverly Hills Cop, Top Gun and Batman to flops like Heaven's Gate, Howard the Duck and Leonard Part 6, Hollywood was never more excessive than it was in the 1980s. In this, the Moneywood era, the purse strings were not controlled by reasonably consenting adults but by pop culture cowboys who couldn't balance their own checkbooks. What they could do was sweet talk the talent, seduce the starlets, snowball the Japanese and slither out of Dodge when the low grosses trickled in. Their out of control lifestyles and know-nothing, raging narcissistic personalities make the original brutal studio heads like Sam Goldwyn and Jack Warner seem like Oxford dons. Yet, for all their flops, these Scoundrels of Spago turned Hollywood into a Big Business that was catnip to Wall Street. They were The Producers, and they were way beyond anything Mel Brooks could dream up.The Moneywood cast of characters includes:-Simpson and Bruckheimer; Guber and Peters; Eisner/Katzenberg/Ovitz: An unusual fresh take on the usual subjects.-Ray Stark, the wizard of Holmby Hills, the most powerful producer of the 80s.-Mario Kassar and Andy Vajna, the Rambo boys, who went from making wigs to making blockbusters.-Menahem Golan-Yoram Globus, the Israeli schlockmeisters who proved that every star had a price.-David Begelman, the embezzler, gambler and sex addict who was rewarded for his sins by getting to run both Columbia and MGM.-Roland Betts, the aristocratic Silver Screen Partners founder and former Yale frat-mate of George W. Bush who was a master at playing the Reagan White House card.-Giancarlo Parretti, the Italian cannery worker who bought MGM, with a little help from his (Sicilian) friends.-David Puttnam The high-toned English advertising whiz who was supposed to raise the Hollywood bar, but ended up barred from Hollywood.Moneywood is the ultimate expose of the real hit men of Hollywood's go-go decade....

Title : Moneywood: Hollywood in Its Last Age of Excess
Author :
Rating :
ISBN : 9780312656898
Format Type : Hardcover
Number of Pages : 336 Pages
Status : Available For Download
Last checked : 21 Minutes ago!

Moneywood: Hollywood in Its Last Age of Excess Reviews

  • J.
    2019-06-13 00:08

    I lived in Hollywood during the 1980s and I thought that this book would offer some new insights into what was happening in the studios at the time. I mean, we had a local as president of the United States and the country was "in the money" as they say. The author tries to tie Reagan into the mix of his story and even begins the book with that premise, but is never successful or perhaps, he lost interest in the idea. He also tries to blame both the Republicans and the Jews for the state of affairs in Hollywood...Although Mr. Stadiem socialized with infamous people like Madam Alex, he does not seem have other such confidences.I was disappointed, in that, there is not really much to this book as far as new material. It is not witty or fun to read... Greed in the 1980s is nothing new and in this book, Mr. Stadiem offers no insight into the whys. Instead he seems to hold a grudge against almost everyone who he came across or would like to have come across. Not that I blame him for that, most of the suits, in the studios, during that period, were morons.The strange thing about Hollywood, that someone who has not live there might not know, is that it is a small, one-industry town. Although the end product may be a movie, or a cultural trend, there are many local things that occurred (and most certainly did in the 1980s) that would have been interesting to have covered. I do not think he had a clue about them. He tells us what an illiterate jerk Jon Peters was--having met the man I agree--but he promised a more profound tell-all in a Vanity Fair article a few years back and here even thanks Jon Peters for his assistance in the book. Talk about journalistic integrity !One of the good parts of the book is the Streisand connection. Boy, was she powerful back then...perhaps he should have stayed with that and the book might have not been such a snooze fest. In the end this book is a cry for recognition from a never was. A man who has used the words of minor players in each of his books to create a vision of a picture far too big for him to see from his vantage point.

  • Sketchbook
    2019-05-26 00:50

    A lively & devastating Insider Look at the Unholy Grail of Horrorwood. Author focuses on the slugs who decide what we see onscreen. Since film is the world's most powful medium, this is not a frivole discussion.

  • Jeff
    2019-05-27 19:03

    Like a history lesson that anytime t starts to become good and interesting. It feels like it gets drained and becomes technical again. Though tibia thorough in the history of Hollywood finance and players.

  • Douglas
    2019-06-20 19:07

    Chock full of well researched facts, tawdry and interesting. Hard to put down, but somehow, I feel empty and soulless. Not particularly edifying.