Read You Forgot Your Skirt, Amelia Bloomer by Shana Corey Chesley McLaren Online

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2000 Publishers Weekly Flying Start AwardBooklist Editors ChoiceChildren’s Literature Choice List Publishers Weekly Best Children's Books Would you DARE to bare your underwear? If you like CLOTHES and people with the courage to SKIRT conventions and address injustice then Amelia Bloomer and her unFITTING ideas will charm the PANTS off you!Amelia Bloomer, a rebellious ref2000 Publishers Weekly Flying Start AwardBooklist Editors ChoiceChildren’s Literature Choice ListPublishers Weekly Best Children's BooksWould you DARE to bare your underwear? If you like CLOTHES and people with the courage to SKIRT conventions and address injustice then Amelia Bloomer and her unFITTING ideas will charm the PANTS off you!Amelia Bloomer, a rebellious reformer and early women's rights activist, invented bloomers (baggy pantaloons worn with a short skirt over them), thus liberating women from the dangerous and oppressive clothing of the mid-nineteenth century. Here is her story, told in buoyant, witty text and beautiful, high styled-illustrations....

Title : You Forgot Your Skirt, Amelia Bloomer
Author :
Rating :
ISBN : 9780439078191
Format Type : Hardcover
Number of Pages : 40 Pages
Status : Available For Download
Last checked : 21 Minutes ago!

You Forgot Your Skirt, Amelia Bloomer Reviews

  • Carolyn Hembree
    2018-10-14 01:05

    Again, rating this one based purely on my five-year-old's response. I don't like kid's books, toys, sandboxes, or fun. She likes the book but doesn't sleep with it: thus, the four, not five. Still, the book provoked a good discussion of why I'm "not a lady" and plan to remain so. Nice bit of history here too -- the ending which fast forwards to modern slacks-wearing broads felt a bit tacked on. Otherwise, solid addition to the library for parents who have noticed that, uh, girls need active role models and a sense of history that includes them. Not just anorexic passive long haired damsels. (Even Elsa -- she needs to consume something other than ice cubes.) Yeah.

  • Kathryn
    2018-10-13 20:08

    Great introduction to some of the pioneers in women's rights in America. The illustrations are so charming and fun! The story itself is nothing that spectacular (I found it a bit annoying that Amelia Bloomer, who was supposedly elevating women's status, kept thinking that things were "silly." Um, couldn't we have found a more grown-up word for her to use?) but I haven't found many books on this subject and it's an important one!!! The historical note at the end is really interesting, too. Let us all be thankful to Amelia Bloomer and her comrades for their tenacity and bravery--I'm certainly glad I don't have to wear whale-bone corsets that rearrange my internal organs, or skirts that weigh 20 pounds!!!

  • Jessica
    2018-10-08 00:19

    A brief, humorous biography for kids of Amelia Bloomer, a suffragette and champion of pants for women, essentially. A fun book, with great illustrations, and a more complete biography at the back, for those looking for more information on Amelia's entire life, and not just the episode that led to her invention of "The American Costume."

  • Reem
    2018-09-24 22:59

    The story is about a women called Amelia Bloomer who tried to fight her society and make changes that she didn’t like in her society. Amelia try to not be a proper lady like many girls in her town who were tiny heavy dresses and can’t work or vote. In fact she think that proper lady is silly, and she want women to have right to do whatever they want. She start to do things against the norms, she start working at her newspaper and designing her convert clothes. At first, she faced resistance from the society. Later on women like her movement and start to wear her clothes design. The story is teaching kids about women's history and the importance of being an individual. The book has a gutter cover where the illustration in both sides is connected in one picture. The author used a colorful theme for his book where the font of the title is playful font. The book has dust jacket where the illustrations are the same as the illustrations on the front and back cover. The front jacket flaps contain a summary of the story while the end jacket shows the honors and acclaim for Mr. Gumpy’s outing. The book has a separate fine print page which comes right after the title page and indicating the publishing information and copyright information, as well as the ISBN number. Also, it has dust jacket where the illustrations are the same as the illustration on the front and back cover. . In terms of the overall rating, I believe the book worth 4 stars. I like the detailed style that the author used and the sketches are amazing. The beautiful drawing made a nice touch to the story.

  • Blair
    2018-10-01 03:20

    Genre: BiographySummary: This book tells the story of Amelia Bloomer and how she fought for women's rights by creating her own newspaper and suggesting that women wear less restrictive clothing. Critique: A. Captivating visual representationsB. This book told the biography of Amelia Bloomer in a beautifully visual manor. The illustrations were rich, colorful, and alluring. The simplistic descriptions of how and why Amelia thought the way she did and how others viewed her were purely brilliant. I feel any student will be able to understand the significance of Amelia Bloomer's accomplishments and the visual representations will stick in readers' minds. C. For example, there is a visual of Amelia carrying a stack of newspapers that she created and also on the page is an illustration of a personal checklist written by her which stated, "To do: Women Vote Work." These words and pictures are so simple yet so powerful. Curriculum Connection: This story would be wonderful to use when talking about women's rights. This story could be used to show how women had to fight to defend their opinions and ideals and many things that we view as normal today were against the social norms of previous times. This is a wonderfully written book that will help children to remember the significance of Amelia Bloomer forever.

  • Tiffany
    2018-10-17 02:01

    Genre: PB13A great story to start teaching kids about women's history and the importance of being an individual. The story by Shana Corey gives the reader a small taste of who Amelia Bloomer is and the role she played in history. Readers get to learn that Amelia was a lady ahead of her time and that her beliefs were very strong. Amelia wanted to make changes in her part of the world for women and found many ways to start making changes happen. The illustrations as well as the writing style heighten the story to a level that is perfect to be read aloud as well as read alone for historical information. This story can be used in many age ranges and would be beneficial to have in every classroom. I love the way the story progresses and shows that by being strong and using your mind you can accomplish anything. this story will give readers a look into the past that will also help them in their future. I will be buying a copy of this book for my own library.Three words to describe this book: Historical, positive, amazing

  • Marissa Elera
    2018-10-06 00:05

    This candy-colored dazzler introduces young readers to the legendary historical figure Amelia Bloomer and her influence on everything from women's suffrage to the styles of clothes girls and women wear this very day. Horrified by the highly impractical, nonsensical fashions of the time, Amelia refuses to conform to her era's ideals and embraces the traveling costume she sees on her friend's visiting cousin, Libby Miller. Adapting the European style to be accessible for the average American woman, Amelia bravely campaigns for the freedom her "bloomers" offer through her suffrage activism and her newspaper reporting. A fizzy spree of beautiful, saturated colors and lovely sketch-like illustration, this book can function in many ways, from a first foray into biographic work to an easily digestible glimpse into women's history. An author's note gives further detail about Amelia's legacy in back. Ages 5-8. "She ran and jumped and twirled... and did all the things she had always wanted to do".

  • Brittany Clark
    2018-10-11 02:10

    A classic. You Forgot Your Skirt, Amelia Bloomer, is a work of historical fiction that is appropriate for elementary aged students. It discusses gender roles and individuality.This is the tale of Amelia Bloomer- a woman ahead of her time, and an early women's rights activist. This story follows Amelia as she creates all kinds of ruckus in her town, from opening her own Newspaper- The Lily, to petitioning for a woman's right to vote, and finally- popularizing bloomers.This is a silly, yet important tale that is interesting to children. The language, plot, and illustrations are sure to keep children enthralled, and offers children many, many things to ponder as they are reading. Shana Corey utilized her insider knowledge as a woman to address women's issues in a charming and empowering way. No negative stereotypes of women are represented.

  • Nomre
    2018-10-06 23:15

    Amelia Bloomer is a historical fiction account of one of the pioneers for women's rights. Unhappy with the inequalities that women faced, she became editor of a women's news paper where she advocated for women's rights. She also helped change the fashion of the time with the introduction of bloomers. The dresses, corsets and petty coats women wore were very restrictive for woman and dangerous to their health. She was introduced to bloomers by a friend and wrote about them in her newspaper, changing fashion for women.The brightly colored and fun illustrations along with the playful fonts made the retelling of historical events enjoyable and relatable for children to understand. This book is a great platform for opening up conversations about women's rights but also tells a fun story that stands on its own.

  • Lucy Sands
    2018-10-23 00:15

    An educational but amusing read introducing young children to the early women's rights movement. Amelia Bloomer rebels against what 'proper ladies' in the nineteenth century should do and fights for women's rights to vote, she works and employs more women within her newspaper and advocates bloomers as a new style of clothing, to relieve women of painful corsets and heavy dresses that restrict movement. Absolutely beautiful, whimsical illustrations support the scrolling text, giving the whole book a historic feel and bringing Amelia's story to life perfectly. Without being overbearingly feminist, it is an excellent introduction for children in this era about the transition women went through to become equal to men. I certainly recommend it!

  • Katie
    2018-10-10 20:07

    This book is about a lady named Amelia Bloomer who hated everything that was considered "proper" for women to do. One day her friend showed up in an outfit that was not a dress, and she loved the idea. She made the outfit for herself, and women from all over were sending her letters wondering about the outfits called bloomers. She was a women's rights advocate, and she became known for bloomers even though she did not invent them. I thought this book was very interesting, and it shows a person that was part of the woman's rights movement. It shows how different people used to dress, and it shows how much times have changed. This book would be good in the classroom when discussing that time period.

  • Mallory Holmes
    2018-10-17 19:10

    I think this book is a great read for students learning about women's rights. It really gives insight as to how women felt during the time when they were constantly being overshadowed by men. It gives the readers a point of view from the women that conformed and the women that rebelled. This book really allows students to see how women used to be treated and shows how they overcame all of the negative treatment. This book is also very colorful and tasteful in the fact that it isn't sad and depressing, but instead delivered in a funny and child friendly way.

  • Randie D. Camp, M.S.
    2018-10-04 23:07

    Amelia Bloomer was the editor of the first woman's newspaper, The Lily, and a leader of the woman's movement. This book highlights her support for woman wearing bloomers instead of 40 pound hoop skirts that limited the mobility of woman and proved to be hazardous to their health. There is an author's note at the end of the book that offers a brief biography of Amelia Bloomer. Whimsical font and illustrations paired with interesting text placement, and bright colors give this nonfiction text a fun appeal to young readers.

  • Susan
    2018-10-20 22:16

    3 1/2 stars, I liked this children's historical non-fiction story. The artwork was a lot of fun, fully an important part of the story. I'm grateful for the accomplishments and achievements of those who fought for women's rights, grateful that we are fully participating citizens, with just as many rights as men, but oh, I don't think I could have the courage Amelia Bloomer had to wear something so strikingly against societal expectations! I actually sometimes mourn that women don't wear dresses more often today. But that opinion isn't part of a book review. Fun book, interesting story.

  • Alyssa Durant
    2018-10-06 23:13

    You Forgot Your Skirt, Amelia Bloomer is a silly book about Women's rights and a lot of things Amelia Bloomer did to help in that area, but mostly how women started wearing pants! I think this is a cute book that definitely reflects the attitude of Amelia Bloomer, and also tells kids that it was once taboo for women to wear anything but a skirt or dress. Another funny thing is that a lot of older people call pants "Bloomers" and you might not even know that the word has meaning behind it. Super cute and great book!

  • Liz
    2018-09-26 21:07

    YES!! This book would have received a full-five star review had the text been in a different font; as it is it's a little too hard to decipher for younger readers. Other than that, this book is fantastic, from it's charming illustrations right down to it's fantastic, almost-unheard-of historical plot (but it really did happen!).

  • Jada Powell
    2018-10-09 03:15

    The genre of this book is NonFiction. This book is intended for readers ages 4-8 years old. This book tells the story of Amelia Bloomer and how she fought for women's rights by creating her own newspaper and suggesting that women wear less restrictive clothing. This book told the biography of Amelia Bloomer in a beautifully visual manor. The illustrations were rich, colorful, and alluring. The simplistic descriptions of how and why Amelia thought the way she did and how others viewed her were purely brilliant. I feel any student will be able to understand the significance of Amelia Bloomer's accomplishments and the visual representations will stick in readers' minds. For example, there is a visual of Amelia carrying a stack of newspapers that she created and also on the page is an illustration of a personal checklist written by her which stated, "To do: Women Vote Work." These words and pictures are so simple yet so powerful. I found the illustrations in this book to be kind of ironic because they are super "girly", but they are historically accurate and fun for children. The author uses repetitive language and incorporates the text into the illustrations. However, it only shows representations of white privileged women during this time period. The book also seems to simplify the struggles of women by glossing over some important topics (like women in the workplace and voting rights). Not one of my favorite books, but it does portray what life was like for (some) women in the past. I would recommend any teacher to read this story to their students because it is very informative in a child friendly way. I do think young readers would like this book because it draws you in by the colorful pictures on the front cover of the book.

  • Enis Norman
    2018-09-30 19:02

    This biographical nonfiction is one I personally believe everyone should pick up and read. Not only can children enjoy a somewhat comical take on the societal norms and struggles of 19th century women, but adults alike can leave with a new perspective on what it means to be "improper". The plot does not go greatly into depth about who Amelia Bloomer was nor does it explain her contributions in detail, but it does offer enough pivotal instances where Amelia went against the grain to leave a strong impression in the reader. Much of the stylistic illustrations provide a very carefree, flowing sense of imagery that reflects the unique lifestyle of Amelia and her followers. From the very beginning of the book, the problem is directly given to the reader, and Amelia takes it on herself to guide them through the process of making a change. In a beautiful manner, the book solves this by emphasizing just how important it is to display YOURSELF to the world, not what they created for you to follow. Amelia lived a life with minimal rules simply because that is what she chose for herself. She refused to allow others to manipulate what she wore or even try to justify the position women found themselves, and sadly continue to find themselves in, within a society dominated by male influence. If presented within a classroom setting, this book would be great to discuss not only the historical background the premise borrows from, but the concepts of gender norms, stereotypes placed on both women and men, as well as what could be accomplished if you embrace your unique ideas and traits. Like that of Amelia, many people will notice when you are passionate in what you do, what you believe, and that will ultimately influence others to express themselves in a similar, empowering way.

  • Jennifer Nnadozie
    2018-10-06 01:07

    This is a biography of how one lady decided to stand out and go against the stereotypical rules of her gender. In Amelia's culture, women were supposed to be prim and "proper" but Amelia could not make sense of what was so great about being proper. She questioned heavily the attire for women as the dresses were heavy, too long, too tight, and too wide. She also could not make peace with the fact that women did not work and were not allowed to vote. In the plot, Amelia disagreed with the so called "culture norms' so much that she decided to fight against them. She first started her own newspaper and invited other women to work at "The Lily." Then, with inspiration from a friend's cousin from Europe, Amelia decided to change the way she dressed. Of course, the "proper" people disapproved but Amelia did not care. Thus, began the wearing of pants for women, adapted from European culture. The illustrations show what Amelia's thought were relating to things she disagreed with, like the long dresses that swept up mud, the wide hoops in the dresses that made women get stuck in doorways, the tight corsets that made women faint, and the new design of clothing that were more comfortable than the heavy dresses that proper women wore. Amelia thought the proper ladies resembled walking brooms because of the proper dresses. In New York where Amelia lived, she protested the right for women to vote while the proper women condemned her for it. In the end, Amelia Bloomer helped change history by advocating for women's rights, operating the first women's newspaper, and adjusting the societal dress code.

  • Reese Bryant
    2018-09-22 22:04

    This book tells the story of Amelia Bloomer and how she fought for women's rights by creating her own newspaper and suggesting that women wear less restrictive clothing. This book told the biography of Amelia Bloomer. The illustrations were rich, colorful, and alluring. The simplistic descriptions of how and why Amelia thought the way she did and how others viewed her were purely brilliant. I feel any student will be able to understand the significance of Amelia Bloomer's accomplishments and the visual representations will stick in readers' minds. This story would be wonderful to use when talking about women's rights. This story could be used to show how women had to fight to defend their opinions and ideals and many things that we view as normal today were against the social norms of previous times. This is a wonderfully written book that will help children to remember the significance of Amelia Bloomer forever.

  • Christy
    2018-09-29 21:22

    2000 Publishers Weekly Flying Start AwardBooklist Editors ChoiceChildren’s Literature Choice ListPublishers Weekly Best Children's Books Would you DARE to bare your underwear? If you like CLOTHES and people with the courage to SKIRT conventions and address injustice then Amelia Bloomer and her unFITTING ideas will charm the PANTS off you!Amelia Bloomer, a rebellious reformer and early women's rights activist, invented bloomers (baggy pantaloons worn with a short skirt over them), thus liberating women from the dangerous and oppressive clothing of the mid-nineteenth century. Here is her story, told in buoyant, witty text and beautiful, high styled-illustrations.

  • Allison D
    2018-10-13 03:18

    This book is a biography about Amelia Bloomer. She invented the bloomer pants. Bloomer is a women's rights activist and fought things like voting rights for women. She shows all of the rules women were expected to follow back in the day. The main plot of the story is how Amelia hated the dresses that women had to wear and she end up inventing the bloomers which are pant like.This book is all about feminism. She is a women's right activist who fought for the equality of women and men. She defies all of society's norms throughout the book. This book is directly related to history and how women were viewed also it show how far women have come.I think that a lot for girls could be interested in a book like this because it shows the power we have. Also while it is nonfiction it is written in a way the is easy to read for children and gets facts across.

  • Wendy Weaver
    2018-09-25 23:04

    This book encourages standing up for what you believe in and I think this is important for students to read about. I love that this has to do with women rights. As a child I never heard about women rights until I entered middle school. I like how this is mentioned but not plastered all over the book. The message throughout is marvels and requires outside discussion for understanding. Great book!Grade level: 3-5Genre: Historical fiction

  • Taylor Parker
    2018-10-01 00:20

    Genre: Biographical nonfictionGrade: 2-3Tells the story of Amelia Bloomer's life in a way that children will love. The story and the illustrations will keep kids wanting to read. Amelia Bloomer wanted to make changes to the way that women were supposed to dress. Women were expected to wear dress and skirts in this time period. This book shows bravery and the importance of standing up for something you believe in.

  • Jessica McDaniel
    2018-10-04 20:27

    Amelia Bloomer didn't like to be a proper girl, she often wondered why ladies had to wear such awkward dresses that didn't even fit through the doorway. She tried to make changes in her society that she didn't agree with and was an early women's rights activist. She did many things like publishing her own newspaper, petitioning women's rights to vote, and changing women's clothing during that time. This book clearly displays sexism and would be great for kids of all ages.

  • Ally Lybbert
    2018-10-16 02:14

    Historical Fiction. I love the idea of using historical fiction in my classroom. I love the idea of girl power, feminism books. I love the illustrations. But this book was a little forceful. We get it. You felt oppressed by uour skirt. I would be afraid of making girls who like to wear skirts feel bad.

  • Shelby Goff
    2018-10-21 03:18

    I loved this book! Great for kids in teaching them history!

  • Seema Rao
    2018-10-21 23:58

    The tale of the inventor of bloomers, A woman who believed in equality for women.

  • Melissa Butler
    2018-10-03 01:14

    This was a great nonfiction story for children to learn history in an exciting way! The text is really easy to read and the text makes the story line more exciting.

  • Stefanie Burns
    2018-10-09 19:05

    I was disappointed in this book. I was hesitant to read this book because of the script print and time period. I wasn't sure my students would connect or relate. However, the reviews I had read were favorable so I thought I would try it with my students. My youngsters had trouble understanding the dress during that time period. The silly, bright illustrations couldn't carry the text.