Read In Flight: Two Novels of the Philippines by Jose Dalisay Jose Dalisay Online

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An emotional exploration of the Philippines, these novels illustrate the connection between a people and their beloved native land. The first novel, Killing Time in a Warm Place, is based in part on the author's own experiences as a student protester and his subsequent capture, imprisonment, and torture during the Marcos dictatorship. His subsequent assimilation to a new sAn emotional exploration of the Philippines, these novels illustrate the connection between a people and their beloved native land. The first novel, Killing Time in a Warm Place, is based in part on the author's own experiences as a student protester and his subsequent capture, imprisonment, and torture during the Marcos dictatorship. His subsequent assimilation to a new society as a speechwriter for the government is depicted, followed by his self-imposed exile to the United States and his eventual return to the islands upon the death of his father, where he is forced to confront past betrayals. The second tale, Soledad’s Sister, delves into the dark side of immigrant and outsourced labor that is endemic worldwide. Following the mysterious death of a young Filipina woman working as an au pair in Saudi Arabia, the narrative chronicles a local policeman’s search to claim her body, locate her next of kin, and give her a proper burial in her native soil. With deep insight into contemporary Philippine culture, this collection captures a nation attempting to reinvent itself in the eyes of the world....

Title : In Flight: Two Novels of the Philippines
Author :
Rating :
ISBN : 9781936182121
Format Type : Paperback
Number of Pages : 360 Pages
Status : Available For Download
Last checked : 21 Minutes ago!

In Flight: Two Novels of the Philippines Reviews

  • Val
    2018-11-09 15:28

    There are two short novels in this book, which I read several months apart."Killing Time in a Warm Place" is a personalised history of the post-independence Philippines, with particular emphasis on the period of martial law declared by Ferdinand Marcos from 1972. It is based on Dalisay's own experiences as a boy and young man. (He became a student activist and was imprisoned, then later recruited by the authorities.)It is informative and fairly objective, but does not come to life as well as some other books I have read which tell history through the lives of real or imagined families. It is not a dry history, as there are several warm family moments, but doesn't quite hit the emotional targets either. I think the sense of detachment could be because this must have been very difficult to write about: the emotions are too strong for the author to allow them to show fully.It is worth reading, especially for anyone who wants to know more about this interesting country and its history."Soledad's Sister" focuses on a contemporary theme. One tenth of Filipinos live and work abroad, sending money home to support their families and the economy of the Philippines. Approximately six hundred a year of them come home in coffins (and this is working age people - remember).From this sad statistic Jose Dalisay has woven a haunting and poignant tale of families torn apart by economic necessity, within a murder mystery. I can't tell you much about the plot without giving away too much information, but who killed the victim is less important than the low value placed on her life and death. This half of the pair of novellas would get four stars easily.

  • Michael Phillips
    2018-11-12 09:11

    I read this book in preparation for an event at the Filipino American Book Festival in San Francisco in order to be prepared to help to introduce Butch Dalisay to festival attendees. I was blown away to learn that everyone already knew him - as he is quite the literary giant in the Philippines.This book features two novels in one - both were my first introduction to Filipino culture. As a Caucasian from the NW, it was interesting to learn a little more about the history that likely affected the parents of some of my friends - this was covered in the first novel. The second novel is based on Butch's reaction to a story he read in the newspaper - about a Filipino who was murdered in Saudi Arabia and had their body shipped back home for burial. I connected more to the second one, even though I'm typically interested in war, conflict and the decisions that people make therein.I give this book five stars because I think more Americans and Canadians should learn about Filipino culture - and I applaud their effort to bring their history - ie - OUR collective history into the mainstream of American conscience.